Topics I would have loved to learn during my undergraduate degree

I’ve completed the curriculum of a “licenciatura en física” which corresponds roughly to a masters degree in physics -5 years of studies at university-. While I’ve had to study what I’d call unusual topics for a physics undergraduate degree such as firing of neurons, there are several “holes”  in topics I would have loved to learn.

Thus far my list of such topics includes:

  • Scattering, in both CM and QM. Indeed I haven’t dealt at all with scattering problems and theory in neither classical or quantum mechanics. I feel this is a huge lack of knowledge that needs to be filled up someday.
  • Solving problems numerically. I’ve had one numerical analysis course that introduced some methods to solve ODE’s, numerical integrations, etc. but it wasn’t geared toward solving physics problems, unfortunately. It was done with Fortran 90, which is probably not the best choice as a first programming language for a physicist nowadays. In the end I feel like they should have taught us Python and help us to solve physical problems like ODE’s and PDE’s that we see hundreds of times during our degree.
  • General relativity. We’ve seen Special relativity using tensors and the Minkowski’s metric, but I feel like an introduction to general relativity would have been quite interesting. Black holes included.
  • Feynman path integrals. I’ve seen them mentioned a lot on the internet in forums and physics stack exchange, yet I have no knowledge on them.
  • Feynman diagrams. Idem than Feynman path integrals.
  • Decoherence in quantum mechanics. I would have loved to learn more about dechoherence and the collapse of the wave function which has never been mentioned during my studies.
  • Solid State Physics. The course I took wasn’t formal enough to my taste and the exercises to solve weren’t  that hard nor numerous so that in the end I feel like the introduction to this topic has been too light.
  • Group theory.
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